Can We Save the Reef?
       
     
       
     
 Dr Madeleine Van Oppen's best hope for the future of the Great Barrier Reef: coral eggs she hopes to breed for resilience in a warming ocean. 
       
     
  Can We Save the Reef?  Host Prof Emma Johnston (right) and Dr Madeleine van Oppen (left) examine the coral-rearing tanks at Sea Sim, Australian Institute for Marine Science, Townsville.
       
     
 Coral researcher Jen Davidson (left) with Dr Madeleine van Oppen (right) during a crucial, once-a-year-only, late-night event: the spawning of Great Barrier Reef coral species. Only red lights can be used to see in the dark, as bright light threatens to remove the coral’s cue to reproduce. Once spawning does begin, Madeleine and other scientists gathered at the Australian Institute for Marine Science retrieve coral sperm and eggs (pictured here) as part of new science to save the Reef.
       
     
 Prof Emma Johnston before a dive to examine the health of coral in the ABC film,  Can We Save the Reef?
       
     
 Behind the scenes, Townsville, at the Australian Institute for Marine Science. Director Adam Geiger and Sound Recordist Dan Miau film Professor Emma Johnston as she asks the question, Can We Save the Reef?
       
     
  Can We Save the Reef?  Producer Colette Beaudry interviews Dr Ruth Gates about the future of coral reefs, at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology.
       
     
 Prof Emma Johnston and Dr Ruth Gates discuss bold new science to save reefs, after a dive in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.
       
     
Can We Save the Reef?
       
     
Can We Save the Reef?

The Great Barrier Reef - home to thousands of marine species - is changing dramatically in our lifetime. Coral, the tiny animal that builds the Reef, is disappearing as climate change warms the world’s oceans. Can We Save the Reef? is the epic story of researchers racing to test bold new science to save our greatest natural wonder.

Broadcasters: ABC Australia, ARTE France, SVT Sweden

Here's what people are saying about the film:
'It was one of the most impressive pieces of science communication that I've seen, blending interesting and complex science with a genuine human empathy that shone through.'

'Congratulations on an insightful, thorough and powerful Catalyst.
You told the narrative of the restoration challenges, risks and potential wins very well.'

'What a wonderful episode of ABC Catalyst on reefs! It was a delight to see two outstanding scientific leaders discuss issues pertaining to reef management under climate stress. The episode was informative, educational, and also inspiring.'

'I loved it.  I watched it with my 13 yr old daughter who was both fascinated, horrified and inspired!'

'I thought the arguments covered all sides and it was beautifully shot.'

       
     
CAN WE SAVE THE REEF? TEASE
 Dr Madeleine Van Oppen's best hope for the future of the Great Barrier Reef: coral eggs she hopes to breed for resilience in a warming ocean. 
       
     

Dr Madeleine Van Oppen's best hope for the future of the Great Barrier Reef: coral eggs she hopes to breed for resilience in a warming ocean. 

  Can We Save the Reef?  Host Prof Emma Johnston (right) and Dr Madeleine van Oppen (left) examine the coral-rearing tanks at Sea Sim, Australian Institute for Marine Science, Townsville.
       
     

Can We Save the Reef? Host Prof Emma Johnston (right) and Dr Madeleine van Oppen (left) examine the coral-rearing tanks at Sea Sim, Australian Institute for Marine Science, Townsville.

 Coral researcher Jen Davidson (left) with Dr Madeleine van Oppen (right) during a crucial, once-a-year-only, late-night event: the spawning of Great Barrier Reef coral species. Only red lights can be used to see in the dark, as bright light threatens to remove the coral’s cue to reproduce. Once spawning does begin, Madeleine and other scientists gathered at the Australian Institute for Marine Science retrieve coral sperm and eggs (pictured here) as part of new science to save the Reef.
       
     

Coral researcher Jen Davidson (left) with Dr Madeleine van Oppen (right) during a crucial, once-a-year-only, late-night event: the spawning of Great Barrier Reef coral species. Only red lights can be used to see in the dark, as bright light threatens to remove the coral’s cue to reproduce. Once spawning does begin, Madeleine and other scientists gathered at the Australian Institute for Marine Science retrieve coral sperm and eggs (pictured here) as part of new science to save the Reef.

 Prof Emma Johnston before a dive to examine the health of coral in the ABC film,  Can We Save the Reef?
       
     

Prof Emma Johnston before a dive to examine the health of coral in the ABC film, Can We Save the Reef?

 Behind the scenes, Townsville, at the Australian Institute for Marine Science. Director Adam Geiger and Sound Recordist Dan Miau film Professor Emma Johnston as she asks the question, Can We Save the Reef?
       
     

Behind the scenes, Townsville, at the Australian Institute for Marine Science. Director Adam Geiger and Sound Recordist Dan Miau film Professor Emma Johnston as she asks the question, Can We Save the Reef?

  Can We Save the Reef?  Producer Colette Beaudry interviews Dr Ruth Gates about the future of coral reefs, at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology.
       
     

Can We Save the Reef? Producer Colette Beaudry interviews Dr Ruth Gates about the future of coral reefs, at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology.

 Prof Emma Johnston and Dr Ruth Gates discuss bold new science to save reefs, after a dive in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.
       
     

Prof Emma Johnston and Dr Ruth Gates discuss bold new science to save reefs, after a dive in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.